Planning with timelines

Planning with multiple timelines

You should all know by now that I’m very fond of visualisations, to say the least. 🙂 Recently I’ve told you about how we did a ”retrospective with timeline”. That thought stayed in my mind when we needed to do some more detailed planning for multiple projects spanning multiple products. This blog post describes what we came up with. Here we go!

”Planning

The idea is simple, the timelines highest up on the whiteboard are projects (or larger initiatives, whatever you like to call them). The other bottom half (or whatever suits your needs) are products or components within a product (depending on the level of details you want to plan for). Usage:

  1. The project timelines shows major activities and milestones. I.e. ”hard facts” that we need to consider. For example a promised customer delivery.
  2. The product (or component) timelines shall show activities (work that needs to be done) and is used to find, and sort out, dependencies (”To deliver project X on time, we need to do activity 1 in product A, before we can do activity 2 in product B” and so on).
  3. Color coding. The activities needed in products (components) have the same color as the project that need them to create traceability.

Preparations

Before the actual planning meeting, you need to find a suitable whiteboard. The larger, the better. Preferably the largest one in the office! But think carefully, you may want to spend some time doing your plan, and therefore keep it up on the whiteboard for some time after the meeting to be able to make adjustments. At least I did, so I found one in a meeting room that is seldom used and started drawing.

Planning with multiple timelines

This is how the “planning with multiple timelines”-meeting was performed.

  1. Some 15-30 minutes before the meeting started, I went to the meeting room and draw the timelines for the projects that we needed to plan (with major activities and milestones). In our case two projects (larger initiatives) and two other activities that were more like dependent on the outcome of the planning. This acts as the starting point for the planning, i.e. things that we intend to deliver.
  2. The meeting started with me explaining the procedure (described above). Then the actual planning started. An example: ”We have promised to do this in that project, for that to work we need to add this in product A and that in B. Wait isn’t this needed in product C as well? Hmm, it is, maybe we should do that first then.” and so on. In this step you can spend as much time as you like, depending on the level of details you want to discuss, and the complexity in what needs to be done. The more dependencies you have the longer time to solve them out. Actually we had one first meeting to get an overview of everything, saving the details for later sessions.
  3. After the planning meeting I always take a picture of the whiteboard using my mobile phone for documentation and the possibility to communicate the plan outside of the room.
  4. As mentioned in a previous point you may want to revise your plan. Preferably you may want do it regularly as long as the projects are running, or you do it in the beginning in a couple of sessions to ”set out the course”.

Example

This is an example of a whiteboard with multiple timelines for planning.

”Planning

Summary

Ok, that was some thoughts and examples on how you can use multiple timelines for planning. If you don’t have several projects (or initiatives) running simultaneously, or you don’t have a complex flora of products you don’t need this. One possible enhancement I can think of is to use a digital whiteboard tool, to be able to keep the plan stored and also to distribute it easier. But for our needs a good old whiteboard suited us just fine. Don’t make things more complex than what they have to be, remember that!

If you don’t like this at all, it feels to much like “MS Project all over again” (however I don’t agree, the key is in the interaction between people to find out dependencies in front of the whiteboard) you can use my other idea for ”visual planning”.

All the best,
Tomas from TheAgileist